E: Australian Safari

Inside a Strangler Fig

Inside a Strangler Fig

Yesterday we got back from the rainforest. We went to O’Reilly’s in Lamington National Park. We went on hikes and saw tons of Strangler Figs. They are vines that start up on a tree and grow down to the ground and then climb all around the tree. Eventually the host tree dies and rots and then all that’s left is the vine that’s now strong enough to be by itself as a strange hollow tree-thing.

There was one we saw that was completely hollow and we could climb inside. When you look up you can see an opening at the top, so the whole plant is like a big straw or pipe

Emma on the Bridge

Emma on the Bridge

That walk was called the Tree Top Walk because it went to a big bridge going through the canopy. We were about 50 feet above the ground and it was super-awesome.

After the first bridge was a platform with a tall metal ladder with a cage around it going up into a huge Booyong tree. It was really cool to climb up the ladder to the platform above. From that high platform there was another ladder to the an even higher platform that was really small. It is about 100 feet above the ground and I went all the way up there!

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Climbing High

Climbing High

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Back near the O’Reilly’s guest lodge there was a place where you could feed beautiful red birds and green King Parrots.

O’Reilly’s was a really fun and beautiful place. It was so cold in the mountains that I really loved having an electric blanket in my bed!

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Today I went to Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary and koalas are snuggly and they do not smell bad. Koala bottoms are white and fuzzy because they sit on the branch all the time. Koalas are sleepy because it takes a lot of energy to digest eucalyptus and there is no protein in it. Do koalas have low blood sugar? They need some of my mama’s baking!

I saw little tiny baby koalas and a mama cuddling her baby baby baby koala with just his foot sticking out. I found out that koala pouches open at the bottom because otherwise when they crawl along branches, sticks would poke in and hurt the baby. The baby doesn’t fall out because the pouch folds over itself at the bottom.

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I also got to feed a baby wallaby. His chin was soft.

Feeding a wallaby

Feeding a wallaby

Wallaby’s are different from kangaroos because they are smaller and fuzzier but otherwise pretty similar.

There were lots of peacocks running around with no cage at the reserve. Max put some kangaroo food in front of him and a peacock came really close to us to eat it. On its butt the peacock has really fluffy feathers.

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Peacock showing off

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It was exciting being so close to the animals and climbing up in the tree. I feel like I’ve gotten to experience something special and Australian.

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One thought on “E: Australian Safari

  1. Wow! That canopy you were on sounds incredible (and maybe scary, being so high up).
    and the parrots on your head were funny1 Did they talk? Some of them are really smart. Maybe one you met was too.
    It’s so great to be able to see and read about your fabulous adventures.
    Love
    Grammy

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